Wireless Mess Network #2

The first wireless mesh networks were mobile ad hoc networks – with wireless stations moving around and participating in a peer to peer network. Mesh is an attractive approach for wireless networking since wireless nodes may be mobile and it is common for a wireless node to participate in a network without being able to hear all of the other nodes in the network. Mobile peer to peer networks benefit from the sparse connectivity requirements of the mesh architecture; and the combination of wireless and mesh can provide a reliable network with a great deal of flexibility.

The popularity of Wi-Fi has generated a lot of interest in developing wireless networks that support Wi-Fi access across very large areas. Large coverage access points (AP) are available for these scenarios, but the cost of deploying these wide area Wi-Fi systems is dominated by the cost of the network required to interconnect the APs and connect them to the Internet— the backhaul network. Even with fewer APs, it is very expensive to provide T1, DSL or Ethernet backhaul for each access point. For these deployments, wireless backhaul is an attractive alternative and a good application for mesh networking.Wireless connections can be used between most of the APs and just a few wired connections back to the Internet are required to support the entire network. Wireless links work better when there is clear line of sight between the communicating stations. Permanent wireless infrastructure mesh systems deployed over large areas can use the forwarding capabilities of the mesh architecture to go around physical obstacles such as buildings. Rather than blasting through a building with high power, a wireless mesh system will forward packets through intermediate nodes that are within line of sight and go around the obstruction with robust wireless links operating at much lower power.This approach works very well in dense urban areas with many obstructions.

There are many different types of mesh systems and they often get lumped together. Since early wireless mesh systems were focused on mobile ad-hoc networks, many people assume that wireless mesh systems are low bandwidth or temporary systems that can not scale up to deliver the capacity and quality of service required for enterprise, service provider and public safety networks.That is not the case. Engineered, planned and deployed effectively, wireless mesh networks can scale very well while still offering a cost-effective evolution strategy that preserves the network investment. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of single, dual, and multi-radio mesh options is the first step.

Wireless Mess Network #1

Capacity of Wireless Mesh Networks
Understanding Single Radio, Dual Radio and Multi-Radio Wireless Mesh Networks

This post not a tutorial, just sharing knowledge about Wireless Mesh Network from many reference we have and from our experience on the field as a wireless internet sevice provider and computer network consultant.

We focuses on wireless mesh infrastructure systems used for creating large Wi-Fi access networks, and examines three different approaches currently available for implementing them. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of each approach with a particular focus on the capacity that is available to users. Can wireless mesh infrastructure systems deliver enough capacity to support broadband services for a large number of users?


Mesh is a type of network architecture. Originally, Ethernet was a shared bus topology in which every node tapped into a common cable that carried all transmissions from all nodes. In bus networks, any node on the network hears all transmissions from every other node in the network. Most local area networks (LANs) today use a star topology in which every network node is connected to a switch (switches can be interconnected to form larger networks).

Mesh networks are different – full physical layer connectivity is not required.As long as a node is connected to at least one other node in a mesh network, it will have full connectivity to the entire network because each mesh node forwards packets to other nodes in the network as required. Mesh protocols automatically determine the best route through the network and can dynamically reconfigure the network if a link becomes unusable. There are many different types of mesh networks. Mesh networks can be wired or wireless. For wireless networks there are ad-hoc mobile mesh networks and permanent infrastructure mesh networks.There are single radio mesh networks, dual-radio mesh networks and multi-radio mesh networks. All of these approaches have their strengths and weaknesses.They can be targeted at different applications and used to address different stages in the evolution and growth of the network.

The first wireless mesh networks were mobile ad hoc networks – with wireless stations moving around and participating in a peer to peer network. Mesh is an attractive approach for wireless networking since wireless nodes may be mobile and it is common for a wireless node to participate in a network without being able to hear all of the other nodes in the network. Mobile peer to peer networks benefit from the sparse connectivity requirements of the mesh architecture; and the combination of wireless and mesh can provide a reliable network with a great deal of flexibility.

to be continued...
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